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The College of Pastoral Supervision & Psychotherapy is a theologically based covenant community, dedicated to "recovery of the soul" and promoting competency in the clinical pastoral field.


« December 2009 | Main | February 2010 »

January 31, 2010

“Take off your hats” – by Rev. William E. Alberts, Ph.D.

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Immediately upon arriving at the hospital at 8 am, I was paged: a 79-year-old black woman, who was Baptist, had just died and her family was requesting the chaplain. I had participated in a family meeting the day before, at which the attending doctor told the many members gathered that their mother was no longer responding to dialysis treatment, that her diabetes was affecting her whole body, and that she probably had two weeks to live at the most. Her oldest son, a tall, burly man in his late 50s, believed she would die that evening, and stayed with her all night. They watched television together, with him holding her hand; and she was aware enough to be present with him. She died at 8 am, with him by her side.

As I entered the room, he immediately came to me and, with his big arms, enveloped me in a hug, and with tears in his eyes said, “I knew she was going to die last night, Reverend. We were together watching television. And this morning she was gone.” “It is so good that you were with her,” I responded. “I’m sure it meant so much to her, as well as to you.”

The oldest son continued the painful and difficult task of calling his many family members. Upon repeatedly dialing numbers and getting voice mail messages, he complained, “Why do they have a damn cell phone if they aren’t going to turn it on?” His grief and frustration in seeking to reach his family told me that I should be with him, rather than attend to other matters and come back when everyone arrived later. He finally got a niece on the line and impatiently said, “Listen! Don’t talk! Your grandma died this morning at 8 o’clock. Get your mom on the phone.” To another relative, he said, “Mom just died. Get your butt over here!” He then stopped dialing, and began sobbing. I went over and put my hand on his shoulder and said, “This is very painful for you.” He nodded, wiping away tears.

As this oldest son resumed the task of calling his family, his mother’s nurse came in and, unobservant of what he was doing, said, “You may want to telephone your family.” He reacted angrily, “What the hell do you think I’m doing!” He then mumbled gruff words under his breath. Taken back by his anger, the nurse said that she had not realized he was trying to reach family. She then asked if she could get him anything, like a cup of coffee. He brushed aside the offer, which led her to say, “I’m just trying to be helpful,” and then leave the room.

At an appropriate time I told the son that the nurse was just trying to be helpful. Later, as the nurse portrayed him to another nurse as “the angry family member,” I told her that he was upset at the difficulty he was encountering in reaching his family. A challenge for any hospital staff person is to understand the emotional dynamics of grief, and how an unresponsive cell phone can lead to the boiling over of frustration—and of anger when a staff person is also not tuned in.

It took four hours for the family to gather at the patient’s bedside. During this time, I responded to the oldest son’s request by calling two Massachusetts correctional institutions in an attempt to inform two brothers of their mother’s death. When the one incarcerated brother was informed that his mother had just died, he became aggressive, wanting to hit anybody, and had to be separated from the rest of the prison population. The other brother had become a Muslim and changed his name, which led me to obtain his correct commitment number by calling his wife, who was in Florida. During our conversation, I gave her the telephone number of her mother-in-law’s room, which allowed her to talk with family members directly.

Some 15 to 20 family members gathered around their dead loved one’s bedside, with her oldest son, standing closest to her, stroking her brow and offering a down-to-earth eulogy: “You are the best mother in the world. You were always there for us. Whether we were right or wrong, you protected us. Always!” He then said to those surrounding her bedside, “We have to do something about this diabetes. We have to protect ourselves. We pledge, Mama, that we’re going to do something about it.” “Yes,” many responded.

Ironically, a February 5, 2006 New York Times editorial, called “Declare War on Diabetes,” states, “Most of those who have diabetes have Type 2, in which obesity and poverty are key contributors, especially among blacks and Hispanics, who are disproportionately stricken… Diabetes is a disease defined by economic disparity.”

There is also a relationship between the far higher percentage of black men incarcerated in prisons and America’s historic white-controlled hierarchy of access to economic and political power. The National Urban League’s 288-page report, entitled, “State of Black America 2009: Message to the President,” found, “Even as an African American man holds the highest office [in] the country, African Americans remain twice as likely as whites to be unemployed, three times more likely to live in poverty and more than six times as likely to be incarcerated.” (See Alberts, How “White Magic” Makes the Ism of Race Disappear, www.counterpunch.com, Sept. 25-7, 2009) This mother had to “protect” her many children from an unequal environmental and educational and economic and political white-controlled playing field.

As the many family members gathered around their loved one’s beside, the oldest son asked me to offer a prayer, before which he ordered everyone to, “Take off your hats.” It was about deep respect for the mother and grandmother and great-grandmother who “protected” her family and lived her life for them. It was a prayer that gave thanks for the preciousness of her life to them and to a god whose love never ends.

A short time later, the patient’s great-grandson, a husky older teenager, marched into the room, looked at his dead great-grandmother, and immediately left in shock. The oldest son said, “Oh, oh. I thought so.” He then proceeded to follow his grandson out of the room, with most of the other family members trailing behind him. They surrounded the great-grandson in the hospital unit’s hallway, where he was overcome with grief. We took him to a private room in the unit, where family members sat him on a chair, and five or six at a time hugged and comforted him. He was sobbing and moaning loudly and his leg was shaking uncontrollably. Finally his physical tremors of grief subsided—only because many of his family members were there to hug and comfort him. The needed comfort of so many who surrounded him is a commentary on any hospital policy that limits family (and friends) visitors to two persons at a time. Such a policy may serve to protect other patients from potentially disruptive behavior of a crowd of people. Or, it could serve to protect white supervisors in charge, who may have an irrational fear of the feelings of black and Hispanic persons.

Fortunately, hospital policy accommodated this large, loving, grief-stricken black family. The oldest son talked comfortingly to his grandson, then helped him to his feet, and, with everyone following, gently led him back to his great-grandmother’s room. They stood together by her bedside, with the great-grandson silently staring at her body. Then, without any word from his grandfather, he took off his hat, bent down and kissed his great-grandmother on the cheek, and quietly left the room.

____________________________
Bill Alberts is a hospital chaplain at Boston Medical Center. Dr. Alberts is a nationally known writer and an occasional contributor to Counterpunch. In addition, he is convener of the New England Chapter of CPSP. He can be reached at william.alberts@bmc.org.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 11:35 PM

An Urban Shaman’s Perspective on Soul Retrieval by Thomas Downes

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The drums were beating at a fast tempo. The Room was dark with the exception of the dimly lit candles surrounding her.

She was in her early twenties, feeling alone and helpless. She claimed that darkness surrounded her soul. The woman couldn’t sleep, eat, and could hardly walk. Her breath was shallow; she felt her life force was leaving her. She was asking for help.

The doctor said that she was depressed and gave her medication. The pills were not working. Her psychotherapy was not effective. She saw her therapist after the auto accident. She was driving the car, her boyfriend was killed. After the accident she was never the same. She was compelled to visit his grave sight everyday, she blamed herself.

One of her concerned friends told her about the concept of soul loss and the importance to see a shaman about this condition.

The aspect of soul loss can be found in various articles. I recommend Sandra Ingerman’s extensive work on this subject.

I would like to recommend some helpful hints that were helpful in dealing with soul loss and especially soul retrieval for this client. They are as follows:


• The person or group that is aiding in the soul retrieval need to have their body, mind and soul grounded. What do I mean by grounded? The need to be physically connected to the earth. Various physical exercises are excellent for this. For example, • Chi Kung, Tai Chi, and Yoga, etc.

• A good sense of humor. These situations are heavy, one needs to lighten up.

• A sense of divine kindness. God, the Holy Spirit, is good. Expect the best. Always be as positive as possible when communicating with the individual.

• Meditate before, during, and after the session. Release all negativity by controlled energetic breathing.

• Practice humility. Remember soul retrieval isn’t only a challenge for the client; it is a wake up call for us. God has given us this sacred work.

• Bathe the client in loving kindness, listen, breath, and be really present.

• Be willing to work with a client 24 hours a day until some progress is made. If no progress is occurring, seek referral.

• Work with a health care professional. And if one can, talk to indigenous shaman about the case.

•Take self-care very seriously. When doing this work, listen to music, dance, sing, and laugh.

• Stay in tune with nature. Watch the birds, the flow of the tides, feel the gentle breeze, be close to animals and plants.

By the way, this is a real story. The woman was helped by the grace of God, the Great Spirit; she is well living a life of a wife, mother, and doctor.

The message here is to love one another as I have loved you.

_______________
Thomas Downes is a member of the Foundation for Shamanic Studies and a certified shamanic practioner. He is also a Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor with the State of New York and an active NGO member on the Committee of Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations. He can be reached by email by clicking here.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 11:31 PM

From the +RED CROSS NEWSROOM --Linda Walsh-Garrison

Earthquake in Haiti: Update #31, January 18, 2010

Red Cross relief teams are mostly mobile right now – traveling to communities rather than working out of fixed-site locations. Here’s the breakdown of where we are right now:
* Hospital, Downtown Port-au-Prince, 150 beds (expects to treat 250,000 during the response)
* Hospital, Carrefour, 120 beds (expects to treat 250,000 during the response)
* Mobile Health (Outreach) Teams, Carrefour (expects to treat 30,000 during the response)
* Mobile Health (Outreach) Teams, Port-au-Prince (expects to treat 30,000 during the response)
* Fixed Health Center, Jacmel (expects to treat 30,000 during the response)
+++++++

While the tragedy in Haiti unfolds, our humanitarian partner, American Red Cross (ARC), settles into the long term relief effort. Fortunately, they are prepared and experienced because of the foresight and dedication of many volunteers and donors. CPSP, too, is contributing to the recovery in many ways - some of our trained members await deployment, others are immersed in their local communities, some are gathering communities in prayers or listening to tears. All are contributors to the recovery.

We are proud to announce that our members, again, lead the way by encouraging the
CPSP-Haiti recovery fund, which has been formed to collect the donations of our chapters. On Feb 16th, the proceeds will be transferred, in one large check, from CPSP to ARC.

Thank you for participating with these steps:
Mail your donation check, made payable to: “CPSP” – marked with “Haiti”
Postdated before Feb 6th. Addressed to:

CPSP
Attn: Treasurer
P.O. Box 6551
Hendersonville, NC 28793-6551


As always, thank you for the generosity in all that you do.

Linda Walsh-Garrison
revlindawalsh@yahoo.com
CPSP-ARC liaison, Spiritual Task Force
917-597-6319

Charles Kirby
CPSP Treasurer
CPSPtreasurer@gmail.com

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 11:07 PM

January 25, 2010

CPSP ENDORSES FAITHFUL REFORM’S---“A FAITH-INSPIRED VISION OF HEALTH CARE”

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At the recent COMISS Network’s Annaul Forum, the Rev. Linda Hanna Walling presented information on the organization “Faithful Reform.” Faithful Reform is an interfaith organization that promotes healthcare reform from a theological and justice-oriented perspective. Faithful Reform provides a crucial voice as our national leaders debate healthcare reform. At the end of the Forum, Rev. Walling presented the document “A Faith-Inspired Vision of Health Care” to President Obama and to the members of the US House and Senate. There are hundreds of individual and group signatories to the “Faith-Inspired Vision,” including CPSP.

Our decision to sign on to the “Faith Inspired Vision” was driven by the Governing Council’s decision in November to endorse comprehensive healthcare reform as a moral issue. All members of CPSP are urged to contact the President and their Senators and Representatives and to urge them to set aside partisan differences and to work to provide quality, comprehensive healthcare for all Americans. In addition, Faithful Reform’s website lists a number of other actions that each of us can take to work toward healthcare reform: www.faithfulreform.org.

The text of the “Faith Inspired Vision of Health Care” is below:

Vision ~ Inclusive: Health care is a shared responsibility that is grounded in our common humanity. In the bonds of our human family, we are created to be equal. We are guided by a divine will to treat each person with dignity and to live together as an inclusive community. Affirming our commitment to the common good, we acknowledge our enduring responsibility to care for one another. As we recognize that society is whole only when we care for the most vulnerable among us, we are led to discern the human right to health care and wholeness. Therefore, we are called to act with compassion by sharing our abundant health care resources with everyone.

Vision ~ Affordable: Health care must contribute to the common good by being affordable for individuals, families and society as a whole. We believe that in the sacred act of creation we are endowed with the talents, wisdom and abundant resources necessary to meet the needs of one another, including the health care needs of all. Therefore, in our calling to be faithful stewards, we understand our responsibility to use our health care resources effectively, to administer them efficiently, and to distribute them with equity.

Vision ~ Accessible: All persons should have access to health services that provide necessary care and contribute to wellness. We believe humanity is sacred and that all persons should benefit from those actions which contribute to our health and wholeness. Therefore, we are called to act with justice and love, to ensure that all of us have access to the health care we need in order to live out the fullness of our potential both as individuals and as contributing members of our society. We must work together to identify and overcome all barriers to and disparities in such care.

Vision ~ Accountable: Our health care system must be accountable, offering a quality, equitable and sustainable means of keeping us healthy as individuals and as a community.

We believe that as spiritual and sacred vessels, we are responsible for the care of our bodies to the best of our ability and for the care of one another regardless of individual circumstances. Therefore, individuals, families, governments, businesses, and the faith community are called to work in partnership for a system that ensures fully-informed, timely, quality and safe care that treats body, mind and spirit.

-Bryan Bass-Riley
________________
Bryan Bass-Riley is Chair of the CPSP Standards Committee and can be contacted by clicking here.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 9:56 AM

January 17, 2010

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. ---"I HAVE A DREAM"

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Without dreams and vision we perish.

Let's keep Martin Luther King, Jr's dream alive.

Let's dream new, daring and bold dreams.

Let's take on the courage to enact our dreams in the service of human suffering and need.

In so doing, we will change the world.

.
-Perry Miller, Editor

Perry Miller, Editor

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 11:07 PM

The Rev. Dr. Richard Liew Retires by Steven Voytovich


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The Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano, newly elevated to the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, offering prayer at Richard’s retirement; The Rev. Dr. Cecily Broderick y Guerra, Vice President of Pastoral Care, assists in the retirement ceremony.

On December 15, 2009, Richard Liew retired from Episcopal Health Services (EHS) after fifteen years of service. Not only did Richard establish Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) in what was a system with about 8 different facilities located at three campuses, but in the last ten years launched indigenous CPE training in numerous regions around the world.

Episcopal Health Services (EHS) is the third CPE program Richard built from the ground up during his thirty years as a CPE supervisor, including establishing a CPE program ministering to migrant farm workers in the CT River Valley in 1974, and building a Pastoral Care and Education Department at New York Hospital-Cornell University Medical Center/Westchester Division from 1990-1994.

Richard holds doctoral degrees including a Ph.D in Pastoral Psychology and a D.Min. in CPE Supervision. He was honored by Association of Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) as International Clinical Pastoral Educator in 2001, and recognized for Outstanding Achievement in pastoral care and counseling by EHS and the Diocese of Long Island in 2006. Richard served as Convener of the College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychotherapy's National Clinical Training Seminar from 1997-2000 and President of CPSP from 2004-2006.

Originally from Malaysia, Richard has most recently been very active and visible at the international level including representing CPSP and the development of indigenous CPE. Richard served on the Coordinating Committee of the International Congress for Pastoral Care and Counseling (ICPCC) beginning in 1999. He represented the AAPC, ACPE, NACC, APC, and CPSP.

Richard has been directly engaged in indigenous CPE in countries too numerous to list, has encouraged many others to enter this creative milieu, and will be continuing to offer his talents here following his retirement from EHS. The NY/NJ Chapter invites our CPSP community to celebrate in Richard Liew a very real example of creativity that CPSP was established to foster and support!

Richard%20Liew%27s%20Retirement%202.jpg
NY/NJ Chapter Members gathered with Richard and current CPSP President Francine Angel Hernandez: left to right:
Rev. Dr. Steven Voytovich former EHS trainee and CPSP Diplomate; Sr. Rosina Ampah, indigenous SIT from Ghana; Imam Luqman Shahid, SIT in Muslim indigenous CPE; Rev. Dr. Richard Liew; Rev. Dr. John deVelder, COMISS and past CPSP President, NY/NJ Chapter Convener; Rev. Joel Warner, retired EHS CPE Supervisor; The Rev. Dr. Curt Hart, CPSP Diplomate; The Rev. Francine Angel Hernandez, CPSP President and EHS CPE Supervisor.
________________________________________
Contact Steven Voytovich by clicking here.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 11:04 PM

January 15, 2010

THE HAITI CRISIS: How to Help--Linda Linda Walsh-Garrison

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At this time International Services, is coordinating the response to the devastating Haitian earthquake. The American Red Cross and International Red Crescent Society is collaborating.

Our liaison, Earl Johnson, Senior Associate, Spiritual Care, Partner Services - reports that there might be “10,000 private humanitarian organizations established in Haiti..and many of our faith group partners have missions, schools, hospitals, orphanages, medical missions, as well as churches there…many are still operating well outside of the capital where the majority of death and devastation has occurred. Since these operations are faith-based, emotional and spiritual support is integrated into normal daily life and practices. Religious faith IS the primary coping mechanism in disaster there and the population is serviced by the faith-related groups working there now, who have long mission histories there.

Currently, the only deployments are Red Cross volunteers specially trained to manage international emergency operations. Please consider supporting your community’s local needs by volunteering with your local Red Cross.”

In our own backyard, consider the ambiguous grief of the Haitian communities. Family members without contact, or unable to identify and bury their loved ones can be haunting. With a large Roman Catholic population, pictures of devastated Cathedrals can be overwhelming for a group steeped in tradition and may have lasting consequences.

To find family members follow the link to: http://www.icrc.org/web/doc/siterfl0.nsf/htmlall/familylinks-haiti-eng
Or call 1-888-407-4747

The American Red Cross has already released $10 million for relief efforts in Haiti and will certainly add more for the greatest needs in both the short-term and in the long-term.

If you would like to donate to the Red Cross efforts:

1. Online at: www.redcross.orgor calling 1-800-RED-CROSS.

2. Individuals can donate $10 to the Red Cross, by texting "HAITI" to "90999 (It will be charged to your phone bill.

3. Submitting a check to: American Red Cross, PO Box 4002018, Des Moines, IA 50340-2018.

As the CPSP American Red Cross Liaison, please fell free to contact me via email if I can be of assistance helping you and your Chapter respond to this human tragedy.

___________________________
Linda Walsh-Garrison, BCCC
CPSP-ARC liaison, Spiritual Task Force, SRT
Garden City Chapter

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an on going crisis and there will be many new developments. This post will be updated as needed. If you have not done so, please enter your email address in the provided space located on the left side-bar so you will be alerted to new post.

As noted in a recent PR article, CPSP is committed to the Red Cross with its Memorandum of Agreement on January 1, 2010...The agreement formalizes the availability of various qualified CPSP certified persons for temporary volunteer placement in the context of disasters. -Perry Miller, Editor

1/19/2010 UPDATE

Dear Conveners,

From the +RED CROSS NEWSROOM
Earthquake in Haiti:
Update #31, January 18, 2010

Red Cross relief teams are mostly mobile right now – traveling to communities rather than working out of fixed-site locations. Here’s the breakdown of where we are right now:
* Hospital, Downtown Port-au-Prince, 150 beds (expects to treat 250,000 during the response)
* Hospital, Carrefour, 120 beds (expects to treat 250,000 during the response)
* Mobile Health (Outreach) Teams, Carrefour (expects to treat 30,000 during the response)
* Mobile Health (Outreach) Teams, Port-au-Prince (expects to treat 30,000 during the response)
* Fixed Health Center, Jacmel (expects to treat 30,000 during the response)

While the tragedy in Haiti unfolds, our humanitarian partner, American Red Cross (ARC), settles into the long term relief effort. Fortunately, they are prepared and experienced because of the foresight and dedication of many volunteers and donors. CPSP, too, is contributing to the recovery in many ways - some of our trained members await deployment, others are immersed in their local communities, some are gathering communities in prayers or listening to tears. All are contributors to the recovery.

We are proud to announce that our members, again, lead the way by encouraging the CPSP-Haiti Recovery Fund, which has been formed to collect the donations of our chapters. On Feb 16th, the proceeds will be transferred, in one large check, from CPSP to ARC.

We welcome your participation with these steps:
Mail your donation check, made payable to: “CPSP” – marked with “Haiti”
and postdated before Feb 9th.

Addressed to:
CPSP
Attn: Treasurer
P.O. Box 6551
Hendersonville, NC 28793-6551


As always, thank you for the generosity in all that you do.

Linda Walsh-Garrison
CPSP-ARC liaison, Spiritual Task Force
917-597-6319

Charles Kirby
CPSP Treasurer
CPSPtreasurer@gmail.com

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 3:07 PM

January 14, 2010

BARELY A DAY BEFORE THE EARTHQUAKE IN HAITI: AMERICAN RED CROSS AND CPSP SIGN A MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT


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Juliet K. Choi, JD, Senior Director,Partner Disaster Services of the American Red Cross, and Raymond J. Lawrence, General Secretary of CPSP, signed a Memorandum of Agreement on January 11, at Red Cross National Headquarters in Washington. The agreement formalizes the availability of various qualified CPSP certified persons for temporary volunteer placement in the context of disasters. Present at the signing and featured in the photo above were Earl E. Johnson, Red Cross's Senior Associate for Spiritual Care Partner Services, and CPSP-Red Cross liaison Linda Walsh-Garrison. Also present were CPSP Registrar Barbara McGuire, and Diplomates David Plummer and Kay Myers.

CPSP is privileged to have this formal relationship with the American Red Cross, and to provide personnel assistance in its humanitarian support to victims of disasters.

We also commend Earl Johnson for his many years of service to the Red Cross in the arena of disaster relief. Earl may be contacting CPSP personnel for possible disaster work in Haiti. We encourage all in the CPSP community to support the work of the Red Cross as well as other agencies in disaster relief.

Haiti is the poorest economic area in the Western hemisphere. Our common humanity requires that we do what we can to offer the people of Haiti moral and material support as far as we are able.

-Raymond J. Lawrence, CPSP General Secretary

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 8:31 PM

January 11, 2010

2010 CPSP PLENARY PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS ANNOUNCED BY JAMES GEBHART


THIS YEAR PLAN ON COMING EARLY ON SATURDAY, APRIL 10th FOR A DAY FILLED WITH WORKSHOPS. LOOK THESE OVER; WE WILL GET BACK TO YOU WITH WAYS TO REGISTER FOR YOUR DESIRED WORKSHOP.

THIS IS A NEW EXPERIENCE: WORKSHOPS CONSISTENT WITH THE PLENARY THEME
.

-Jim Gebhart, 2010 CPSP Plenary Coordinator

2010 PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

On Saturday, April 10, one day prior to the 2010 CPSP Plenary, a variety of workshops will be offered related to the theme of the Plenary, “The Recovery of Soul.” These include leadership from the shamanic community, from practitioners of forms of healing touch and energy work, and from representatives of pastoral care and psychotherapy in the CPSP community.

More details of these workshops will be forthcoming in the CPSP Pastoral Report as other members of the community might wish to offer a workshop. At this time the following workshops are announced:

THE SHAMANIC DRUM. Deborah Ling, M.A., Director of Shamanic Practice, leader. For persons who are interested, Deborah will discuss the historic nature of the drum in shamanic (and other) traditions. For persons who wish to make their own drum, Deb will be the instructor. Expense for the drum-making kit is $115.

THE HISTORY AND THEORY OF SHAMANIC PRACTICE. Deborah Ling,, leader. Attention will be given to a differentiation between spiritual direction and shamanic practice.

ADVANCED BODY TALK DEMONSTRATION. Mary Shields, Ph.D., Advanced Body Talk Practitioner, leader. This will feature a demonstration of powerful balance and Reiki methodology.

GENTLE HEARTS AND HANDS. Jane Reed, M.A, R.N. Healing Touch Practitioner. She will explain and demonstrate the polarity system, the chakra system, reflexology and vibration energy.

EXISTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY AND SUPERVISION. George Gibbs, CPSP Diplomate, psychotherapist at Ohio State University Harding Hospital. A workshop in two sections. The first will be how existential philosophy effects the psychology of personality and human behavior. The second will be how these ideas provide an important approach to psychchotherapy and supervision.

PSYCHERGONOMICS: HOLISTIC WELLNESS IN THE WORKPLACE. Robert Menz, CPSP Diplomate, Employee Counselor and EAP Director, Emerson Climate Technologies. Understanding how psychosocial factors impact the health and well-being of employees.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 9:29 PM

January 7, 2010

2010 CPSP PLENARY BROCHURE

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CPSP will celebrate its 20th year as a vibrant and innovative certifying and accrediting organization in the clinical pastoral field. The context for the celebration of the CPSP community will be the 2010 CPSP Plenary held in Columbus, Ohio on April 11-April 13, 2010.

Act now to join the celebration!

Below is a link to download a PDF file of the 2010 CPSP Plenary Brochure.

DOWNLOAD 2010 CPSP PLENARY BROCHURE

DOWNLOAD 2010 PLENARY PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

DOWNLOAD: EVENTS IN COLUMBUS DURING 2010 PLENARY

Please spread the word about the CPSP Celebration at the 2010 CPSP Plenary by sending them the link to this post.

Perry Miller, Editor

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 12:26 PM