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The College of Pastoral Supervision & Psychotherapy is a theologically based covenant community, dedicated to "recovery of the soul" and promoting competency in the clinical pastoral field.


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June 5, 2006

Esteban Montilla Co-Authors Book, Pastoral Care & Counseling with Latino/as

<imgEsteban Montilla, a CPSP Diplomate, and Ferney Medina just published an influential book that presents a new paradigm for pastoral care and counseling. Multiculturally competent pastoral counselors/psychotherapists, chaplains, clinical supervisors, and pastors who want in this pluralistic global society effectively serve need to read this masterpiece.

The President of the largest counseling association, American Counseling Association (ACA), Dr. Patricia Arredondo writes about Esteban and Ferney’ books as follow:

“R. Esteban Montilla and Ferney Medina have created a comprehensive guide for Pastoral Care and Counseling with Latinas and Latinos. Through use of Biblical references and metaphors, the authors lay the foundation for an intricate discussion of pastoral caregiving and spiritual guidance. By exploring the roots of Latino culture through historical retrospection and the emergence of a multiethnic and pluricultural Latino society, the authors reveal the complexity that exists within this multicultural community.

They discuss the pillars of Latino culture—the family and religion—as two inherently connected aspects of life. The integration of the two lends to a healthy and successful helping relationship. The family is the building block of Latino culture, as the authors detail, and is the source that community members gather their strength from. The value of family is emphasized, as well as how Latinos care and respect for their loved ones. The authors discuss the importance of a religious involvement for families and how the spiritual realm in a point of connection for family members.

<imgSpiritual guidance is also how Latino families deal with problems and instills faith in the future. The authors explore how Latinos have diverse expressions of faith and that each person’s relationship with religion is an intimate and transcendent experience. The chapters discuss appropriate clinical helping skills and cultural competence by recognizing the importance of spirituality in Latinos’ lives and how the family structure and daily life is influenced by this connection to a high power.

Montilla and Medina have created an informative and pragmatic text on an under-recognized helping and healing paradigm—the integration of spirituality into the counseling relationship. Being involved with families on the most intimate of levels and joining their healing process reveals the very deep and meaningful helping relationship of pastoral caregivers, rooted in spiritual togetherness.”

R. Esteban Montilla is a Diplomate Clinical Pastoral Education Supervisor serving with Driscoll Children's Hospital and the Ecumenical Center for Religion and Health, San Antonio, Texas.

Ferney Medina is a Clinical Chaplain and Pastoral Counselor serving with Mission Regional Medical Center, McAllen, Texas.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 8:38 PM

VA Chaplaincy and Clinical Pastoral Education Requirements by George Hankins-Hull

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It is important to clear up some confusion that many have had concerning employment requirements as a VA chaplain.

In order to qualify for employment as a VA Chaplain, an individual must have completed two units of Clinical Pastoral Education, or demonstrate equivalent training.

Units of CPE completed and certified by the College of Pastoral Supervision & Psychotherapy, National Association of Catholic Chaplains and The Association of Clinical Pastoral Education all count toward this requirement.

Equivalent training is not less than 800 hours of supervised ministry in a health care setting, such as a hospital or nursing home, which incorporated both ministry formation and pastoral care skills development.

To be considered equivalent to CPE, training must include the following components:

1. It must be a formal educational program, with curriculum, theological reflection, and evaluation components, which includes a component of performing health care ministry.

2. The program must include 400 hours of supervised education, training and ministry for equivalency to one unit of CPE.

3. The educational supervisor(s), preceptor(s), teacher(s), or coach/mentor(s), responsible for the program must be qualified to provide the supervision.

4. The educational model must include an action/reflection component (that may vary from one program to another) that may have included but not be limited to: verbatims, case conferences, worship seminars, spiritual assessments, theological reflection, and group process.

In describing supervised ministry that you would like to be considered as "equivalent training" please include the following information for each period of training.

To be considered equivalent to CPE, training must include the following components:

1. It must be a formal educational program, with curriculum, theological reflection, and evaluation components, which includes a component of performing health care ministry.

2. The program must include 400 hours of supervised education, training and ministry for equivalency to one unit of CPE.


3. The educational supervisor(s), preceptor(s), teacher(s), or coach/mentor(s), responsible for the program must be qualified to provide the supervision.

4. The educational model must include an action/reflection component (that may vary from one program to another) that may have included but not be limited to: verbatims, case conferences, worship seminars, spiritual assessments, theological reflection, and group process.

In describing supervised ministry that you would like to be considered as "equivalent training" please include the following information for each period of training.

•The beginning and ending dates of training

•The name and location of the institution(s) in which the supervised ministry was performed

•The name(s) and title(s) of the educational supervisor(s)/instructor(s)

• The total number of hours of performance of ministry, classroom or didactics, and individual meetings with the supervisor/instructor


CPSP Objectives of Clinical Pastoral Education:

230. Objectives of CPE:

CPE is designed to provide theological and professional education utilizing the clinical method of learning in diverse contexts of ministry. There are professional benchmarks of expected outcomes from CPE which formulate the competency objectives. They are as follows:

1 To develop the ability to make use of the clinical process and the
clinical method of learning. This includes the formulation of clinical data, the ability to receive and utilize feedback and consultation, and to make creative use of supervision.

2 To develop the self as a work in progress and to cultivate the
understanding of the self as the principal tool in pastoral care and
counseling. This includes the ability to reflect and interpret one’s own life story both psychologically and theologically. (Accreditation Manual, p.14).

3 To demonstrate the ability to establish a pastoral bond with persons
and groups in various life situations and crisis circumstances.

4 To demonstrate basic care and counseling skills including listening,
empathy, reflection, analysis of problems, conflict resolution, theological reflection and the demonstration of a critical eye so as to examine and evaluate human behavior and religious symbols for their meaning and significance.

5 To demonstrate the ability to make a pastoral diagnosis with special
reference to the nature and quality of religious values.
(Accreditation Manual, p. 15).

6 To demonstrate the ability to provide a critical analysis of one’s own religious tradition.

7 To demonstrate an understanding of the dynamics of group behavior
and the variety of group experiences, and to utilize the support,
confrontation and clarification of the peer group for the integration of personal attributes and pastoral functioning.

8 To demonstrate the ability to communicate and engage in ministry
with persons across cultural boundaries (Accreditation Manual, p. 15).

9 To demonstrate the ability to utilize individual supervision for
personal and professional growth and for developing the capacity to evaluate one’s ministry.

10 To demonstrate the ability to work as a pastoral member on an
interdisciplinary team.

11 To demonstrate the ability to make effective use of the behavioral
sciences in pastoral ministry (Accreditation Manual, p. 15).

12 To demonstrate increasing leadership ability and personal authority.

13 To demonstrate familiarity with the basic literature of the field:
clinical, behavioral and theological.

For More Information on VA Chaplaincy visit: Department of Veterans Affairs National Chaplaincy Center.

Posted by Perry Miller, Editor at 4:12 PM